[The Story] Learning From Others

For as many complaints people unrequitedly say about their relationships, I only hear a few positive comments. I imagine that will also be true in “The Story,” where men will complain to John [right] and women will complain to Trishna [left] about their spouses. Maybe it’s easier to complain? Since the last essay focused on the negatives, below, let’s focus on the positives, because really the only difference is the intended outcome: progress or regress?

Spoilers?: Minor (just character brainstorming)
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[The Story] Complaining About Others

A customer complained to me about his wife’s technological irresponsibility. “I’ve got an audience, so let me tell you…[1]” and though his rationale was sound – yes, you should be careful with expensive technology – I applied their seemingly rocky relationship to Trishna [left] and John [right]. How much will they accept or tolerate of each other’s faults? I’ve always imagined “The Story” to be primarily a nice story about two friends. Will they have sore spots?

Spoilers?: Minor (exploring character traits)
WANNA CONSIDER WHY PEOPLE SHARE SECRETS WITH STRANGERS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Cluttered Living Space

I don’t completely endorse the idea that settings are like characters. While someone’s workspace or personal space can convey surface-level symbolic meaning over personality, what is tolerable or not, and more, I don’t think it’s a comprehensive glimpse into a person’s, or character’s, mind. Still, in “The Story,” there are some key settings that could provide interesting anecdotal information into the minds of Trishna [left] and John [right]. Let’s declutter the psychology from the physical.

Spoilers?: Minor (set-building… as character-building?)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW THINKING TOO LITTLE OR TOO MUCH ABOUT SETTING CAN BE WASTEFUL? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Ubiquitous Moving Gigs

I always thought you got work based on what you knew, then later thinking it was who you knew, now it might be who you can convince to hire you. It’s a gamble in real life, just like “The Story,” with John [center] and Trishna [not shown] facing greater odds due to their impairments. Though they must try harder, there are some hard working ways that they can get the odds more in their favor.

Spoilers?: Minor (job-hunting brainstorming 1 of 2)
WANNA READ BOTH ABOUT HOW THESE CHARACTERS PUT IN THE EFFORT TO GET WORK AND WHAT MIGHT SET YOU AHEAD AS WELL? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Mother’s Day Moments

Mother’s Day for the Lanchester family is an important celebration. Like Father’s Day, and everyone’s birthday, it’s more than just an excuse for Trishna (left) to take photos of her newborn niece Alejandría (“Allie Pally”). It’s a time to reconnect, fortify long-term goals, work through any lingering problems that might need attention, and celebrate the matriarchal side of the family. Let’s explore how Mother’s Days might feel in the first few years of “The Story.”

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (hypotheticals, character development)
WANNA READ ABOUT SOME COOL MOMS AND POTENTIAL MOMS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Entertaining Solo Hobbies

The introductory conflict of “The Story” is how two social outcasts, John (left) and Trishna (right), want to develop their relationship yet can’t due to geographic distance. It’s not spoiling this conflict to say they do meet, since this conflict is the narrative introduction deemed “The Scene,” and it’s a convenient inference. If their natural inclination then is spending all of their time together, after spending years physically apart, would they even have separate hobbies?

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development) WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE MIGHT OVERSATURATE OURSELVES BY SOAKING IN TOO MUCH OF ONE THING? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Painting as Teamwork

While painting this inconsequential accent wall, I thought about how Trishna (left) and John (right) might paint in “The Story.” Trishna might lock her breaks, dip her roller with extension pole into a paint tray, paint one section, move, and repeat. John might then get the finer details along the corners. Since painting takes preparation, planning – and when working with others, teamwork, collaboration, and delegation of duties – how well would they handle any possible friction?

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development)
WANNA READ AN ACCIDENTALLY DEEP PSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS PROMPTED FROM A RANDOM TASK? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!