[The Story] Complaining About Others

A customer complained to me about his wife’s technological irresponsibility. “I’ve got an audience, so let me tell you…[1]” and though his rationale was sound – yes, you should be careful with expensive technology – I applied their seemingly rocky relationship to Trishna [left] and John [right]. How much will they accept or tolerate of each other’s faults? I’ve always imagined “The Story” to be primarily a nice story about two friends. Will they have sore spots?

Spoilers?: Minor (exploring character traits)
WANNA CONSIDER WHY PEOPLE SHARE SECRETS WITH STRANGERS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

Advertisements

[The Story] Shave and Bathe

Now that I’m writing bi-weekly updates to “The Story,” I dredged up an interesting realization: why not write about some of the scenes that float through my imagination? It’ll be good practice for the real thing! Throwing characters into hypothetical situations can help build context for how they’ll act in other scenes. Like a movie playing on repeat, what if these scenes are already swimming around in your imagination? Let’s start with an innocent one:

Spoilers?: Minor (rough scene walkthrough)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW THE MORE YOU WORK ON A PROJECT, THE MORE THE PROJECT GROWS SEEMINGLY BY ITSELF? THEN ISN’T IT A MATTER OF SHAVING THE EXCESS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Entertaining Solo Hobbies

The introductory conflict of “The Story” is how two social outcasts, John (left) and Trishna (right), want to develop their relationship yet can’t due to geographic distance. It’s not spoiling this conflict to say they do meet, since this conflict is the narrative introduction deemed “The Scene,” and it’s a convenient inference. If their natural inclination then is spending all of their time together, after spending years physically apart, would they even have separate hobbies?

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development) WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE MIGHT OVERSATURATE OURSELVES BY SOAKING IN TOO MUCH OF ONE THING? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Painting as Teamwork

While painting this inconsequential accent wall, I thought about how Trishna (left) and John (right) might paint in “The Story.” Trishna might lock her breaks, dip her roller with extension pole into a paint tray, paint one section, move, and repeat. John might then get the finer details along the corners. Since painting takes preparation, planning – and when working with others, teamwork, collaboration, and delegation of duties – how well would they handle any possible friction?

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development)
WANNA READ AN ACCIDENTALLY DEEP PSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS PROMPTED FROM A RANDOM TASK? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Weak versus Weakness

We can decide whether our weaknesses will cause us to become weak. While most weaknesses can become excuses that can potentially control us, there are exceptions that should be respected. My intentions are pure, so let’s not focus on any possible hypotheticals for this week’s update to “The Story.” Instead, let’s focus on two casual examples of when main characters John (off-center) and Trishna (center) decide to not let their physical weaknesses make them weak.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development) WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE’RE MORE CAPABLE THAN WE MIGHT INITIALLY THINK OURSELVES TO BE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Meeting New People

How often do you meet new people? Not just regurgitating scripts during transactional interactions with humans, either, how often do you allow yourself open up so that new people can meet you? That does require the vulnerability of letting your guard down, inviting people to see your ego’s grit, and possibly getting hurt. “The Story” will focus on many people and encounters, centering around Trishna (left) and John (right), almost as guides through their world.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (philosophical character-building!) WANNA SEE HOW JOHN AND TRISHNA MEET OTHER FICTIONAL CHARACTERS? AND HOW THIS ANALOGY WORKS WELL FOR MAKING NEW FRIENDS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Meeting Their Heroes

They say meeting your heroes is a terrible thing because of over-expectation. Stumbling through my words and thoughts, I gained artistic context and overcame shyness from meeting some of my “heroes.” How about John (center-right) and Trishna (center-left)? Do they even have celebrity figures they admire? Let’s take a psychological detour for this week’s update to “The Story” and consider how respect for authority, ambitions, and the drive to emulate, create, or procrastinate inspires idolization.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (possible scene ideas) WANNA POTENTIALLY MEET THE HEROES OF THE HEROES? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!