[The Story] Shave and Bathe

Now that I’m writing bi-weekly updates to “The Story,” I dredged up an interesting realization: why not write about some of the scenes that float through my imagination? It’ll be good practice for the real thing! Throwing characters into hypothetical situations can help build context for how they’ll act in other scenes. Like a movie playing on repeat, what if these scenes are already swimming around in your imagination? Let’s start with an innocent one:

Spoilers?: Minor (rough scene walkthrough)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW THE MORE YOU WORK ON A PROJECT, THE MORE THE PROJECT GROWS SEEMINGLY BY ITSELF? THEN ISN’T IT A MATTER OF SHAVING THE EXCESS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

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[The Story] Frequenting Zbigniew’s Teriyaki

If my ambitions for “The Story” include comprehensive commentaries on the nature of our reality, how much nuance should go into those commentaries? A thoroughly-built restaurant might evoke patron conversations idly chatting over the fine flatware or reveal restaurateuring price negotiations for finer flatware. The narrative should always guide the focus. It’d waste your time and my effort if Trishna (left) and John (right) only visited Zbigniew’s (center) Teriyaki once. But if they go frequently…?

Spoilers?: Minor (worldbuilding, character development)
WANNA CONSIDER BALANCING WOLRDBUILDING DETAIL BASED ON THE NARRATIVE WEIGHT OF THE LOCATION? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Applied Self-Confidence] 501 And Counting

My bull-headed dash through 501 essays has taught me to eschew listless energy. I’m focused on what directly or indirectly helps my mission of becoming a professional writer. When times are bad, escape into nuances that might push along the mission. When times are good, go full-bore! The more practice, the less insecurity I’ve felt over trivialities, enabling “this” to become a natural part of my life. Writing is as subconscious for me as eating breakfast.

WANNA READ ABOUT HOW IN ORDER TO DO ANYTHING, YOU MUST FIRST BE WILLING TO REPEATEDLY MAKE MISTAKES? PRACTICE IS ALL ABOUT LEARNING WHAT NOT TO DO. CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Literature Build] Ironing Out Artificialities

My big goal is writing “The Story.” The flash-bang idea started in high school and just will not go away. I could do as many might: try, fail, and shelve the idea as a quaint notion. I can’t do that! I am only stopped by my writing ability, which I know cannot yet do justice to “The Story.” Here are 5 points I refined in my process while writing “Covered in Artificialities” that might help you!

WANNA BRAINSTORM CLEARLY? FIND WRITING TOOLS THAT HELP YOU WRITE RIGHT NOW? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Adoptability of Homelessness

“Do you have 50 cents you could spare this afternoon?[1]” “Yeah, sure… You hanging in there alright?[2]” I gave him all my change, 8 cents, and one dollar more. “Thank you. Yeah, I am.[1]” The man wearing a dirty hoodie in the dry heat walked off, looking disbelieved over money. Life in “The Story” isn’t easier than our own. John (left) had periods of teenage homelessness before being “adopted” into Trishna’s (right) life. Can we adopt everyone?

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (worldbuilding, rant piece) WANNA CONSIDER AN UNCOMFORTABLE TOPIC AND MAYBE HOW WE CAN WORK TOWARD MAKING IT MORE COMFORTABLE FOR EVERYONE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Aspirations of Homesickness

How much would you sacrifice to make your aspirations possible? How important is your comfort? As we grow older, there’s a growing sense of wanting more from life. For Trishna (right), she wants to go to college to fulfill her dreams and become independently successful, well, along with John (left), yet part of that means leaving her retiring service dog Pollyanna (center) and family at home. How might that answer be addressed in “The Story?”

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character exploration) WANNA CONSIDER HOW MUCH SACRIFICE THEY AND WE GIVE TO ACHIEVE OUR ASPIRATIONS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Loving “The Scene”

I’ve been procrastinating on writing “The Story” because I can’t write concisely nuanced enough yet to do it all justice. There’s an early scene codenamed “The Scene” that drives Trishna (right) and family three hours away to collect John (left). “The Scene,” and therefore “The Story,” would fall flat if I wrote it today. I don’t know when, or if, I’ll develop that skill. Loving the time until then is the only way to succeed.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Major (plot exploration) WANNA READ ABOUT HOW WE MUST LOVE WHAT WE NEED TO DO IN ORDER TO DO IT WELL? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!