[The Story] Weak versus Weakness

We can decide whether our weaknesses will cause us to become weak. While most weaknesses can become excuses that can potentially control us, there are exceptions that should be respected. My intentions are pure, so let’s not focus on any possible hypotheticals for this week’s update to “The Story.” Instead, let’s focus on two casual examples of when main characters John (off-center) and Trishna (center) decide to not let their physical weaknesses make them weak.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development) WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE’RE MORE CAPABLE THAN WE MIGHT INITIALLY THINK OURSELVES TO BE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

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[Fiction Practice] The Old Guy

“OK, Jane. We have time for one more question.”
“What’s the successful candidate look like in this role? What should I focus on to prevent myself from being unsuccessful?”
“Well, lemme tell you about the old guy. What a lazy bum! Couldn’t do nothing! He couldn’t understand anything we’d give ‘im! We’d tell him repeatedly how to do his assigned work and he’d seem to just forget! Stay away from the guy you are replacing![1]”

WANNA READ ABOUT AN INTERVIEW GONE WRONG WITH JUST ONE QUESTION? OR RATHER, HOW ONE QUESTION CAN REVEAL WHAT IS HIDDEN BENEATH THE SURFACE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Career Story] Friendly, Not Friends

One thing that’s hurt me frequently was thinking that professional contacts were friends. The problem stems from misgauging what layer of trust we operate on. When I talk like a friend yet they think we’re merely acquaintances, they won’t reciprocate. Is there an easy way to prevent this awkwardness? Is it just as simple as being friendly with people, waiting an arbitrary period of time, before considering them friends? Can our colleagues ever become friends?

WANNA FIND THE TIMING FOR A FRIEND METRONOME? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Career Story] Your Interview Story

I think we fear interviews because of uncertainties. There are infinite factors outside of our control, and remember to “relax, nothing is under control.[1]” What might be under your control? Yourself! Control your physical fitness by resting, eating well, staying hydrated, and arriving early. Control your mental fitness by finding something humorous to enjoy beforehand. Control the interview by preparing yourself with one flexible story that you can build on throughout the conversation. Here’s mine:

WANNA PREPARE FOR SUCCESS? WHEN YOU’VE PREPARED ALL FACTORS INSIDE YOUR CONTROL, YOU CAN ADDRESS ANY FACTOR OUTSIDE YOUR CONTROL! CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Applied Self-Confidence] How To Forget

I used to profoundly respect anyone’s opinion. It’s not that I’m some kind of awful curmudgeon now. More that I refuse to freely accept anyone’s subjectivities about the world, or myself, until I’ve listened with my empathically critical ear to validate their true intentions. If the argument is reasonable enough, I’ll buy it. If not, I move on with my life. Why obsess over negative thoughts? Why not forget and carry on? That’s easy, right?

WANNA CONSIDER HOW LETTING THINGS GO CAN HELP BUILD YOUR MENTAL FORTITUDE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Book Review] Discipline Equals Freedom (2017)

199 pages leaves no padding to hide behind. Eloquent sweet nothings are not present here. “Jocko” Willink doesn’t pull any punches with Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual. He is on a singular mission to teach us how to combat the lazy or unmotivated moments that unsuspectingly tempt us with “sugar-coated lies” found in fast food or unearned leisure. These are your enemy if you have any ambitions or if you want to keep what you’ve earned.

Rating: ★★★★★ [5/5]

WANNA READ ABOUT THE SORT OF DIRECTED DISCIPLINE AND SELF-IMPROVEMENT YOU’LL READ IN THIS BOOK? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Applied Self-Confidence] Admitting Your Mistakes

The 400th entry to Better Zombie had the wrong URL for over 12 hours… oops! That’s a trivial mistake. One problem I had growing up – maybe we all did – was the fight toward perfection through never acknowledging your mistakes. It’s always someone/something else’s fault I didn’t get that good grade. That irrational irresponsibility leads to subconscious suffering. Rather than admitting a problem to overcome it, if you avoid confronting the problem, you grow to fear it!

WANNA CONSIDER HOW WHEN WE ADMIT AND CORRECT SMALL MISTAKES, IT CAN HELP US ADDRESS LARGER MISTAKES? HOW IT CAN ALL HELP US AVOID LOSING OUR HEAD? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!