[The Story] Cruising Through Genealogy

World-building is merely window-dressing for storytelling. While it certainly is important to loosely understand genealogical, socio-political, and geographical backgrounds within our stories, we are telling stories via subjectively relaying communication rather than objectively deducing science, so the focus should be on the point of these stories. My ambitious project, “The Story,” is about a few topics including overcoming adversities. Considering this more specific topic, would one of Trishna’s great-great-great-grandparents be thematically relevant to the narrative?

Spoilers?: Minor (just an essay…?)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE NEED TO PRIORITIZE DETAILS AS A WAY TO RELAY IMPORTANT INFORMATION RATHER THAN BOG OUR READERS DOWN WITH WEIGHTY FACTS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Sindian History Museum

I don’t yet know how much variation there is from our world and “The Story.” The easiest variations on fiction are real life and completely divergent paths. If I just wrote about India, then I’d just have to fly there, explore the area, and report my findings in a convenient way, just like writing about some imaginary location. Writing about a pseudo-India, Sindia, would require more research and nuance for John and Trishna to explore.

Spoilers?: Minor (artifacts within worldbuilding)
WANNA EXPLORE THE CREATIVE WRITING THOUGHT PROCESS OF DEVELOPING A WORLD? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Frequenting Zbigniew’s Teriyaki

If my ambitions for “The Story” include comprehensive commentaries on the nature of our reality, how much nuance should go into those commentaries? A thoroughly-built restaurant might evoke patron conversations idly chatting over the fine flatware or reveal restaurateuring price negotiations for finer flatware. The narrative should always guide the focus. It’d waste your time and my effort if Trishna (left) and John (right) only visited Zbigniew’s (center) Teriyaki once. But if they go frequently…?

Spoilers?: Minor (worldbuilding, character development)
WANNA CONSIDER BALANCING WOLRDBUILDING DETAIL BASED ON THE NARRATIVE WEIGHT OF THE LOCATION? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

The Story: “Hey, Chicken Foot!”

After re-kindling my efforts toward writing The Story, I’ve been using idle time to brainstorm ideas about character and plot. I came up with their names in high school: John and Trisha. John is intentionally like John Doe. Trisha’s name isn’t set yet because her character has been becoming much more complex over the years, including what I’ll cover below.

Continue reading “The Story: “Hey, Chicken Foot!””