[The Story] Anxiety Over Progress

I get the most anxious when I strive to achieve something but have no room for intolerable failure. It’s fine when there’s an acceptable tolerance for failure; things just break. However, when it seems like there is no tolerance for failure, that’s when my pulse weakens and my senses overextend. John [left] and Trishna [right] will face plenty of anxieties in “The Story,” but how they handle certain conflicts will be interesting and perhaps helpful.

Spoilers?: Minor (minor character musings)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW ANXIETY EXPOSURE CAN BE HELPFUL? BUT ONLY IF WE RESOLVE OURSELVES TO OUR FATES AND WORK TOWARD OVERCOMING OUR SHORTCOMINGS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

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[The Story] Programming New Opportunties

Our only limitation is our willingness to tolerate adversity toward achieving new opportunities. If something is difficult, but we see it as a necessary step, we’ll do it. If not, we won’t. Most characters in “The Story” have some ambition. It’s the varying degrees of how much adversity they’re willing to tolerate that makes it interesting. John [left] and Trishna [right] have higher thresholds for tolerating adversity to achieve opportunities than, say, Sammohini or Jane.

Spoilers?: Minor (character personality explorations)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW LEARNING ISN’T JUST A MATTER OF BEING THERE AND INCIDENTALLY LEARNING? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Unagi Teriyaki Writings

Storytelling is like cooking. Whether you just want a light snack, tiding you over until dinner, or need a meal preparing you for some arduous task, there are many meals for any situation and flavor. This flexibility has one constant: the importance of good ingredients. Fancy flatware doesn’t matter if the chicken teriyaki or unagi aren’t good. In my long-form writing effort, “The Story,” John [left] and Trishna [right] are the primary storytelling character… “ingredients.”

Spoilers?: Minor (brainstorming spicy characterizations)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW STORIES CAN HELP NOURISH OUR IMAGINATIONS LIKE MEALS NOURISH OUR STOMACHS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Sammohini Arc] Nervously Resizing Window

“Nice! I’m glad it’s working as well!”
Sammohini, an entry-level Eville Medical computer repair technician was talking to a nurse, Ariel, over the phone while she was remotely connected into the computer that Ariel was using out in the hospital’s ER. She had just confirmed that a fix had resolved an issue successfully on the computer and was nervously moving the cursor around on screen in a wide concentric circle.
“Same here! Why’d it happen?”

WANNA READ ABOUT HOW WE SUBCONSCIOUSLY GET NERVOUS FOR OUR DUTIES? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Sammohini Arc] Five Minutes Away

The entry-level helpdesk technician looked at the clock: 4:55 PM. Five minutes until clocking out and getting a ride from her date. She was dressed up a little nicer than normal. Nothing too fancy, since it was a work evening, but it’d also been a while since they’d gone out anywhere. Just as she was starting to daydream about dinner, the Eville Medical helpdesk phone rang: “IT… this is Sammohini!” “Yeah, hello, just a quick question.”

WANNA SEE WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO ROUGHLY ESTIMATE YOUR TIME, HOLD YOUR RESOLVE, AND MOST IMPORTANTLY- NEVER ASSUME

[The Story] Helping versus Helped

How much give and take should be in any friendship or relationship? For acquaintances or friendships, it’s easy: with just a casual understanding of each other’s general life circumstances, we can broadly discuss difficult subjects in passing. Deeper relationships enrich us, yet, there’s almost too much focus on nuance. In “The Story,” specifically focusing on the relationship of Trishna [left] and John [right], how much of their focus is on the trees or the forest?

Spoilers?: Minor (broadly exploring relationships)
WANNA HELP YOURSELF DIG INTO THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RELATIONSHIPS AND THE VALUE OF ALTERNATE PERSPECTIVES? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Float Tank] Your Personal Therapist

Besides the healing physicality of sensory deprivation, meeting my personal therapist – myself – has been the biggest benefit I’ve gained from floating. To really meet yourself, you have to come to terms with your greatest failures and your most benign successes. You can’t lie to this therapist. Conversely, nothing is lost in the translation from your psyche to your spoken language and back. It is difficult peering behind the masks we subconsciously wear, but it’s worthwhile.

WANNA CONSIDER A PSYCHOLOGICAL ANGLE OF FLOATING? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!